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Recent News

June 5, 2014

Certain bonds connecting biological cells get stronger when they’re tugged. Those bonds could help keep hearts together and pumping; breakdowns of those bonds could help cancer cells break away and spread. - Read complete press release -

May 10, 2013

Five projects have been chosen as the initial recipients of the College of Liberal Arts and Science’s Signature Research Initiative. -Read complete press release-

May 7, 2013

Sanjeevi Sivasankar knows a lot about how the healthy cells in your body stick together. He and his research team have studied cell adhesion proteins called cadherins. They’ve developed an instrument that takes 3-D measurements for single-molecule studies of cell adhesion. And they’ve discovered three types of bonds (ideal, catch and slip) by studying cadherins when they’re subjected to a pulling force. - Read complete press release -

November 1, 2012

The human body has more than a trillion cells, most of them connected, cell to neighboring cells. How, exactly, do those bonds work? What happens when a pulling force is applied to those bonds? How long before they break? Does a better understanding of all those bonds and their responses to force have implications for fighting disease? -Read complete press release -

August 2, 2012

By blending optical and atomic force microscope technologies, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have found a way to complete 3-D measurements of single biological molecules with unprecedented accuracy and precision. - Read complete press release -